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What's Hot


 

What's Hot


There's a lot of talk these days about fast cars and which car is the fastest. Recently Motor Trend did a comparison between the 2013 Nissan GT-R and the 2012 Porsche 911 Turbo S and offered their opinion. Now while I don't pretend to know everything when it comes to this subject, I've done my research and based on my initial findings, I'm not being partial but I'd like to present my favorite - the 2013 Nissan GT-R.

This car is hot personified! It's goes beyond powerful because once the accelerator is pressed you automatically feel more than just raw power. With a 545 HP twin-turbo V6 engine, this car is not only massive in strength but it is also highly refined. Rather than using just cast-iron liners, each cylinder features a unique plasma coating on cylinder walls, with an independent intake system for each bank of cylinders. Its powerful twin turbo takes advantage of a Premium Midship design for balance, where much of the engine sits back in the chassis. This car is not only uniquely brilliant, but it's built to perform.

Performance and superb handling, of course, but more importantly the potential of the car can be accessed by all drivers in all conditions. According to the automaker, pricing for 2013 GT-R models – which are now making their way to some 700 certified GT-R dealers across the U.S. – begins at $97,620, including $1000 in destination charges. That's about $6670 more than 2012 GT-R Premium models, but then again, 2013 models do have a little more to show for it.

From start to finish, each GT-R engine is handcrafted by its own master engine-builder in a climate-controlled "clean room." Each turbo-twin V6 is precisely assembled from lightweight, highly durable aluminum and magnesium parts. It takes the exacting standards of Nissan's most talented and devoted engine builders to produce an engine that has redefined what a supercar can be.

Technicians have installed all the external components, including a magnesium oil pan and lightweight, racing derived twin turbochargers; integrated with the intake manifolds for high strength with lighter weight. An hour-long test provides initial break-in of the engine and a verification of key specifications. In all, a total of 44 minutes of operation from idle to holding at redline for 10 minutes helps provide instant assurance of lasting durability, which makes this car born ready to race.

Two clutches, no clutch pedal. GT-R's paddle-shifted 6 speed sequential dual clutch transmission shifts as quickly as 0.15 seconds when in R-Mode. Inside are separate clutches for the odd and even gears. When in an odd-numbered gear, the adjacent even numbered gear is "pre-selected," ready to make the shift immediately. Then to achieve ideal front-to-rear weight distribution, GT-R's clutches, transmission and transfer case are mounted in the rear of the chassis, creating the world's first independent rear transaxle for an All-Wheel Drive vehicle.

A Nissan versus Porsche comparison test makes no sense because the name "Porsche" seems to personify speed. But having looked a little closer, I realized that these two cars are strangely alike in contrast. Both are powered by 3.8-liter six-cylinder engines force-fed by two turbochargers. Each one has four seats; both are AWD, and both present rapid-fire dual-clutch transmissions. And they are fast. Incredibly, mind-bendingly, tire-destroyingly, reason-defyingly fast.

It came as no surprise to me that Porsche reigns as the "king" at the race track, because it laid down a time of 10.9 seconds through a quarter mile at 127.4 mph. The "slower" GT-R did it in 11.1 seconds at 124.8 mph. Historically, that makes these two the third and fourth-quickest cars ever tested. The almighty Veyron is by far the fastest with a time of 10.4 seconds at 139.9 mph, and the 691-hp Lamborghini Aventador is in second place with a time of 10.6 seconds at a blistering 133.9 mph.

Don't go crowning the Porsche king of this comparison just yet. The new GT-R recently danced around Motor Trend's figure eight track in 23 seconds flat, the third-best time recorded. The only quicker vehicles are the Porsche GT2 (22.9 seconds) and the unbelievably athletic Corvette Z06 with the Z07 package wearing throwaway 80-treadwear and Cup tires (22.8 seconds). Not bad for a 3887-pound sumo, eh? The Turbo S is right there, with a time of 23.2 seconds.

So, which car do you think is faster, the new 2013 Nissan GT-R or the 2012 Porsche 911 Turbo S? Well, many popular car magazines and enthusiasts have their own opinion but here are just a few accolades in support of the 2013 Nissan GT-R, I'll let you draw your own conclusion.

2007

Top Gear Awards – Supercar of the Year

2008

Autocar – Drivers Car of the Year

2008

Evo Magazine – Car of the Year

2008

Japan's Most Advanced Technology Award

2008

Popular Mechanics – Automotive Excellence Awards 2009
Automobile Magazine – Automobile of the Year

2009

Edmunds.com – Edmunds' Inside Line Editors' Most Wanted Awards: Instant Classic

2009

Motor Trend – Motor Trend Car of the Year

2009

Popular Science – Auto Tech Grand Award Winner

2009

International Car of the Year

2009

World Performance Car

2009

Targa Tasmania Modern Champion

2009

Targa West Challenge Modern Champion

2009

Targa West Competition Modern Champion

2010

Redline Time Attack Modified AWD Champion

2010

Targa West Challenge Modern Champion

2010

Targa West Competition Modern Champion

2010

Yahoo – Listed as having one of the best resale values of any sports car

2011

Targa Tasmania Modern Champion

2011

Targa West Competition Modern Champion

2011

Motor Magazine Performance Car Cup Winner

2011

Guinness World Records – Fastest 0–60 mph acceleration by a four seater production car

Images credit: Motortrend